Tablets are too limited

I appreciate the comments on tablets. Since my first reply I now realize that some of my observations have been validated. My wife's use of an iPad has helped her (eyesight decrease) be able to magnify items to read by placing them in "white text on black" mode but the logic of the iPad still mystifies both of us. We're both used to Mac and Windows computers but the "glitchy" nature of iPad responses with no instructions on our part frustrates and confuses both of us. Stuff disappears without warning and for no apparent reason. Admittedly, some of the problem is unfamiliarity with the product but can a tablet be so intuitive that one cannot use it effectively? I'll stick with a traditional laptop or desktop, thanks. Anyway, how can a product like the iPad be so useful when there are NO written instructions on how to start using it; you have to download the instructions of 140 pages or so with instructions that we couldn't find. The lack of functionality mentioned by other CNET contributors gives me more support for sticking with what I do understand. Our most recent attempt at connecting a printer so my wife could have a hard copy of what she had created meant having a knowledgeable relative spend 3 hours of his time getting the unit to print. This is not "out-of-the-box" easy to use. Maybe Alvin Toffler's book from the 70's "Future Shock" was right...maybe man's and woman's ability to keep up with the pace and complexity of change is causing our "shutdown".... Sorry, but that's our experience and now we're stuck with a less than useful $500 gizmo.....